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GROUND WEAPONS (Armor)

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Alvis Vickers Limited FV.101 'Scorpion' Light Tank
Type:
Light Tank/Combat Vehicle Reconnaissance, Tracked-Fire Support Vehicle (CVR,T-FSV)
Country of origin:
United Kingdom
Armor:
12.7-25 mm average, aluminum alloy
Crew:
Commander, Gunner, Driver
Air transportability:
roll-on/roll-off C-130
Dimensions
Length:
4.794 m (15.75')
Width:
2.235 m (7.33')
Height:
2.102 m (7.0')
Ground clearance:

Ground pressure:
0.36 kg/cm² (5.12 psi)
Weights and loadings
Weight:
8,075 kg (17,765 lb)
Power train
Engine:
One 152 hp Cummins 6BT 5.9, 6 cylinder diesel engines, 1,600 rpm[Uprated]; One 190 bhp (142 kW), Jaguar J-60 engine, 4.21 liter, 6 cc gasoline, derated to 160 hp at 4,750 rpm [original]
Power-to-weight ratio
: 20.2 hp/ton
Transmission:
Automatic, 4 speed [Uprated] ;Semi-automatic, 7-speed in all directions, hotshift type[original]
Transfer case:
Axles:
Tracks:
Suspension:
Performance
Max land speed:
[road] 80.5 kph (50 mph)
Water speed:
4 kph (2.5 mph)
Acceleration:
0-48 kph (0-30), 16 sec
Range:
650 km (404 mi)
Vertical obstacle:
0.5 m (1.64')
Trench:
2.057 m (6.75')
Max fording depth:
1.07 m (3.51')
Gradient:
60%
Side slope:
Turning diameter:
Weapon Systems
Main gun:
L23 76 mm/23, rifled gun
Max effective range:
1,000 m (3,280')
Rate of fire:
Elevation:
-10° to +35°
Traverse:
360°
Ammunition:
40 rounds
Ammunition type:
HE, HEAT, HESH, Smoke, Canister
Rangefinder:
Laser
Night gun sight:
White searchlight
Secondary gun:
L3 7.62 mm coax MG
Max effective range:
Rate of fire:
Ammunition:
3,000 rounds
Ammunition type:
Ball
Rangefinder:
None
Night gun sight:
White searchlight
Other defenses:
2 x Four-barrel smoke dischargers, Nightvision equipment
Variants used:
FV.101 Scorpion (FSV), FV.104 Samaritan (Ambulance)
Program:
Designed by Alvis for the British Army, which entered service in 1973 and served until 1994. Its primary function for the British Army was to be a fast, air-transportable reconnaissance vehicle, to be used to scout ahead of the main MBT units. Over 4,000 had been produced in the UK and Belgium by the time production ceased in the mid-90's. The Philippines initially received a total of forty-seven Scorpions through Special Supply Agreement (SSA) with UK. Of those, forty-two (42) were basic configuration of Scorpion fighting vehicles while the remainder was its variants specially designed to perform special role requirements. Out of the ten (10) variants acquired six (6) were ambulance (FV.104 Samaritan), and three (3) were recovery vehicles (Samson). Currently about twenty-eight units survive and serves in the LAD. The PA utilizes the Scorpion as a light tank using its weapons in direct fire support to infantry.
Structure: The FV.101 Scorpion is lightly armored, however its all-welded aluminum alloy armor is resistant to machine-gun bullets up to 14.5 caliber, with the side and rear capable of defeating multiple 7.62 caliber hits. Its main gun is the L23, 76 mm cannon, (designed and developed by the Royal Armament and Development Establishment and manufactured by the Royal Ordnance Factories) with 40 rounds that can fire HESH against hostile armor for up to 3,000 meters and HE shells against infantry for up to 5,000 meters. Though HESH shells have lost much of its effectiveness due to the advent of sophisticated armor, its is still effective on the side of tanks, on IFVs, APCs and lightly armored fortifications. A L37 7.62 mm with 3,000 rounds is mounted coaxial with the L23. For additional defense, four electrically-operated smoke/grenade dischargers are mounted on the side of the fully traversing turret. It can employ smoke, illuminating and training rounds. The crew of three (the commander also acts as the loader) wears helmets to provide protection against sharp corners and to use the built-in intercom. The most notable characteristic of the Scorpion is its light weight and its engine making the Scorpion highly mobile and very maneuverable. The Jaguar engine can accelerate from 0 to 48 kph in 16 seconds has a high power-to-weight ratio. Its gear is semi-automatic, seven-speed in all directions. It has five aluminum road wheels each side with rubber tires with the first and last having hydraulic shock absorbers and has an average life of 4,820 kilometers. Its ground pressure is described as "lighter than a man's" at 5 psi allows the Scorpion to operate in boggy terrain. The Scorpion is designed to operate in temperatures of -30° to +50° Celsius. It is air-transportable and can fit inside a C-130H. The FV.104 Samaritan variant is an armored ambulance, with similar hull construction as the Scorpion but have high sides and no turrets, to give more room inside. The normal crew of three includes two medical personnel and the driver. The vehicle is fitted with an air cooler for the casualty compartment. There is space for four stretcher casualties or four sitting casualties. Entry and exit is facilitated through a rear door.
Modernization: The upgrading of the Scorpion tanks was proposed in 2001, to extend its operational life for another 15 years and improve its capabilities and performance in terms of mobility, firepower and communication, The provisions for maintainability and an increased survival capability will also be pursued as part of the program but was deferred in 2003. With the dwindling number of serviceable tanks, LAD conceptualized the re-powering of the serviceable tanks into a diesel powered engines, contracting the Steelcraft Industries to re-power one unit utilizing Cummins 6BT 5.9 Diesel Automatic Engine. The new engine was proposed to replace the phased out, hard to maintain and expensive to operate original 4.2L Jaguar gasoline Engine. The prototype re-powered Scorpion is still in the process of fine tuning the adoptability of the installed engine with the other components of the power pack/train. As such, LAD is in the process of researching, fabricating and fitting the necessary parts to perfect the integration of the diesel engine. The Test and Evaluation shall be conducted upon completion of the correct engine integration. In mid 2011 plans were laid out to uprate twelve operational units and six non-operational units (without engines) with diesel engines, under the PA's CUP with an allotted budget of Php 200 million.

Photo at right, PALAD's FV.101 Scorpion Light tank, taken from the 1990 Independence day parade at the Luneta, and at left is a FV.104 Samaritan variant. Thanks to opus for the pics.

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United Defence/ FNSS Savunma Sisternleri A.S. AIFV (Dutch Army designation YPR -765/ Turkish Army designation ACV-300 AAPC)
Type:
Armored Infantry Fighting Vehicle (AIFV)/ Advanced APC (AAPC)
Country of origin:
USA/ Turkey
Armor:
Aluminum/ laminate
Crew:
Commander, Driver + 7 Infantry
Air transportability:
Dimensions
Length:
5.26 m (17.25')
Width:
2.82 m (9.25')
Height:
2.62 m (8.6')
Ground clearance:
0.43 m
Weights and loadings
Weight, combat:
13,687 kg (30,174.67 lb)
Power train
Engine:
One 264 hp Detroit V-6 Diesel Model 6V-53T, 416 liter fuel capacity
Power-to-weight ratio:
21.92 bhp/ton
Transmission:
Allison automatic transmission
Transfer case:
Axles:
Tracks:
Suspension:
Suspension has five road wheels, drive sprocket at front, idler at rear. No return track rollers.
Performance
Max land speed:
65 kph (40 mph)
Water speed:
6.3 kph (3.91 mph)
Acceleration:
Range:
490 km (305 mi) [road]
Vertical obstacle:
0.74 m (2.43')
Trench:
1.83 m (6')
Max fording depth:

Gradient:
60%
Side slope:
30%
Turning diameter:
Weapon Systems
Main gun:
Oerlikon KBA 25 mm Bushmaster III in EWS; or 12.7 mm in cupola
Max effective range:
Rate of fire:
Elevation:
-10° to +50°
Traverse:
360°
Ammunition:
Ammunition type:
Rangefinder:
Night gun sight:
Thermal imaging
Secondary gun:
7.62 mm LMG coax
Max effective range:
1,000 m
Rate of fire:
100 rpm
Ammunition:
Ammunition type:
Rangefinder:
Night gun sight:
White searchlight
Other defenses:
Smoke dischargers
Variants used:
AIFV variant, ARV variant
Program:
Designed and produced by United Defence (formerly FMC), is basically an improved version of the M113 APC with an uprated armor and weapon system. It serves with the armored units of the Belgian (514), and Turkish (650) armies. This vehicle is sometimes erroneously called Chaimite by Philippine press, which is another separate type of wheeled armored vehicle. The Philippines received a total of 85 vehicles as per US Library of Congress records of which about 45 units are still in use. In February 2004 the PA received two additional units from FNSS Savunma Sisternleri A.S. of Ankara, Turkey including an Armored Recovery Vehicle (ARV) variant, for Php 55.76 million. The ARV will serve as a mobile maintenance platform of the LAD in the field or to assist in disaster relief operations. The AIFV are utilized by the LAD and the PSG.
Structure: The AIFV is a tracked, all-terrain, amphibious armored combat vehicle. Glacis plate with trim vane at 45°, hull roof horizontal to hull at rear, angled downwards with hull rear sloping inwards. Driver at front left, with the commander at rear, engine compartment on right. Turret has vertical sides and rear, offset to right of hull. Large ramp in hull rear. Hull sides vertical with curve to top, upper part of rear troop compartment slopes inward, two firing ports with vision block above in each side, to allow its passengers to engage hostile units under the protection of its armor. AIFV is fully amphibious, propelled by its tracks. Before entering the water, a trim vane is erected at the front of the vehicle. It is armed with an Oerlikon KBA 25 mm gun with a coaxial 7.62 mm machine-gun mounted in an Enclosed Weapon System (EWS), which is electrically-operated and fully stabilized, which provides a shoot-on-the-move capability. The turret drive system also incorporates a day and night thermal imaging system for visibility under the cover of darkness. The 7.62 mm gun is used as anti-aircraft as well as anti-infantry defense.

Two photos of PALAD's AIFV, taken from the 1990 Independence day parade at the Luneta. Thanks to opus for the pics.

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United Defence/ Food Machinery Corp. M-113A1/A2 APC
Type:
Armored Personnel Carrier, Tracked (APC,T)
Country of origin:
USA
Armor:
38 mm sloped 60° to rear/ 27 mm flat/ 12 mm flat, rolled 5083/5086 H32 aluminum alloy
Crew:
Commander, Driver + 11 Infantry
Air transportability:
roll-on/roll-off C-130
Dimensions
Length:
4.86 m (15.95')
Width, over track shrouds:
2.69 m (8.82')
Height:
2.5 m (8.2')
Tread:
2.16 m (7.08')
Ground clearance:
[A1] 0.41 m (1.34'); [A2] 0.43 m (1.425')
Ground pressure, zero penetration:
[A1] 0.51 kg/cm² (7.3 psi); [A2] 0.55 kg/cm² (7.9 psi)
Weights and loadings
Combat weight:
[A1] 10,920 kg (24,080 lb); [A2] 11,343 kg (25,007 lb)
Weight, empty:
[A2] 9,957kg (21,951.43 lb)
Power train
Engine:
One 215 bhp (81 kW) General Motors 6V53, 6-cylinder, 2 stroke water cooled diesel, 2,800 rpm, 360 liter fuel capacity
Power-to-weight ratio:
17.1 hp/ton
Transmission:
Allison TX-100, 3 ranges forward, 1 reverse
Transfer case:
Axles:
Tracks:
{A1] T130E1, center guide, single pin, steel with detachable rubber pad; [A2] T150, center guide, double pin, steel with chevron rubber pad
Suspension:
Torsion bar type. Five individually sprung dual/track road wheels. Flat track return rollers. Ten-tooth front drive, drive sprockets. Dual adjustable idlers at rear of track. Shock absorbers on first and last road wheels/track, additional shock absorber on second wheel/track on A2 units.
Performance
Max land speed:
[road] 64 kph (40 mph); [cross-country] 25 kph (15 mph)
Water speed:
5.8 kph (3.6 mph)
Acceleration:
0-30 kph (0-19 mph), 11 sec
Range, cruising:
[road] 483 km (300 mi)
Vertical obstacle:
0.61 m (2')
Trench:
1.68 m (5.5')
Fording depth:
1.02 m (3.33')
Gradient:
60%
Side slope:
30%
Turning diameter, minimum:
7.9 m (26')
Weapon Systems
Main gun:
12.7 mm HMG in 1-m Textron turret or pintle-mounted 12.7 mm with cupola
Max effective range:
1,800 m
Rate of fire:
450 rpm
Ammunition:
2,000 rounds
Ammunition type:
Ball
Rangefinder:
None
Night gun sight:
Passive/IR
Secondary gun:
7.62 mm LMG coax
Max effective range:
1,100 m
Rate of fire:
100 rpm
Ammunition:
2,000 rounds
Ammunition type:
Rangefinder:
Night gun sight:
White searchlight
Other Defenses:
Nightvision Equipment Passive/IR
Variants used:
M113A1, M113A2, M113 FSV, M113 20 mm, ACV-300
Program:
Developed and designed in the late 50's by Ford Motor Co. and Kaiser Aluminum and Chemical Co. from the M59 and M75. The M-113 was originally developed and manufactured by the Food Machinery Corp. (FMC) of San Jose, California as to fulfill the requirements for a family of Airborne Armored Multi-Purpose Vehicle (AAM-PV). It was utilized extensively during the Vietnam war, where its passengers quickly learned that instead of just transporting them to the front, they can fight from the inside the APC's protected hull against hostile infantry, and the workhorse APC was born. About 80,000 of all types were developed by USA's FMC and Italy's OTO Melara and it is still in production. The PA acquired about 100 units (fifteen delivered 1970, twenty delivered 1976 (confirmed), twenty-five delivered 1978, twenty delivered 1981, all units M-113A1s) with surviving units serving with the LAD.
Structure: Designed to be air-transportable, it can be carried by C-130H "Hercules" transport aircraft. The APC was designed simply to transport infantry to the frontlines in a light caliber-protected hull. The box-shaped hull, sloping 60° to the rear, is built of aircraft-grade aluminum in which the vehicle derives its versatility - it is lightweight thereby allowing the use of a small engine, a General Motors 6V53, 2 stroke, 6-cylinder diesel, developing 215 bhp, at 2,800 rpm, and having a larger payload than most vehicle its size. Can accelerate from 0 to 30 kph in 11 seconds. Has turning radius of 4.27 meters and ground pressure of 7.9 psi. Fuel capacity, 360 liters (95 gallons). DS200 controlled differential, steering levers with differential band brakes. Suspension each side has five road wheels, drive sprocket in front, rear idler, no track return rollers, with upper part of track normally covered by rubber skirt. It has high speed on roads, and is capable of cross-country travel over rough terrain, though if any of its track shoe is damaged, the vehicle may become inoperable or unstable in motion as it may result in roll-overs, when steering. The APC can also ford streams and lakes powered by its tracks, trim vane are erected and bilge pumps are turned on before fording. Infra-red driving lights are standard, with M19 infra-red periscope for driver. The driver is seated on the front and left side with the engine to the right, while the commander's cupola is at the center with externally mounted 12.7 mm HMG with hatch to the rear. Personnel compartment to the rear, which enters and leave through a power operated rear ramp. Vertical hull sides with no firing ports or vision blocks. A roof hatch is also located above the troop compartment, where an additional pintle-mounted, shielded machine-gun can be emplaced, in addition to the primary gun, which is usually 12.7 mm HMG inside a one meter Textron turret (in uprated versions), or a 12.7 mm mounted on a cupola with shields or the more common pintle-mounted, shielded 12.7 mm HMG. External box-type fuel tanks on each side of ramp on rear hull. Other M-113 variants seen in service within the AFP is one that sports a 25 mm chain gun in an EWS, similar to that in the AIFV or the L23, 76 mm cannon and turret system obtained from a decommissioned Scorpion unit. The M-113's main weakness is that it is vulnerable to high-caliber weapons and RPG hits. Survivability can be increased by adding bolt-on armor and sand bags outside and kevlar spall liners inside. Though it is lightly armored compared to most IFVs, its ability to be deployable from the air from aircraft both fixed-wing and rotary make the M-113 versatile and indispensable. Units upgraded to A1 standards in 1964, have their gasoline engines replaced by diesel, to increase its range and reduce its flammability and a new power train was incorporated. Units upgraded to A2 standard, first introduced in 1979, had a new, improved engine cooling layout brought about by switching the location of the fan and radiator. A higher-strength torsion bars which increased road wheel travel and ground clearance, and a stronger rear idler was installed and raised 5.1 cm (2") to reduce the incidence of ground strikes. New shock absorbers were fitted, and shock absorbers were added to the second road wheels on each side. New armored fuel tanks were available as well and were fitted externally located on either side of the rear entry ramp. They contained the same 360 liters (95 gallons) of diesel as the internal tank, and freed up 0.45 cubic meter (16 cubic feet) of internal space. Weight with the external fuel tanks increased to 11,740 kg (25,880 lb); 0.58 kg/cm² (8.2 psi); and the length was 5.3 meter (17.375 feet). Smoke grenade launchers were also made available and these four-tube assemblies were located on either bow below the headlight cluster. PA units though neither have the external tanks nor the grenade dischargers.
Modernization: Some units are planned to be upgraded to Fire Support Vehicle (FSV) status by arming them with the Singaporean company CIS' 40 mm AGL/12.7 mm HMG coax turret, which is capable of firing airburst ammunition, approved budget for the project is Php 144 million. The Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) uses this version with the 40 mm/12.7 mm combo turret. Other plans may include additional bolt-on steel armor. One unit was tested in 2008 as a mortar carrier, with the intention to provide immediate and responsive indirect/direct fire support to dismounted and light infantry troops in the conduct of fast paced offensive operations as the LAD plans to organize a mortar platoon per battalion. Another unit was succesfully tested as a platform for the Colt Browning Mk. 39 20 mm cannons, which came from decommisioned PAF F-5A. In 2000, plans to acquire/upgrade the fleet to A3 status for screening, recon, security missions and transport of equipment during tactical situations were implemented under the AFP Modernization program. The projects intends to extend the operational life of the M113s for another 15 years and improve its capabilities and performance in terms of mobility, firepower, communication, survivability and maintainability. On December 2009, FNSS Savunma Sisternleri A.S. delivered six upgraded M113 units (ACV-300) complete with two years of spares for Php 139 million. The old M113, procured from US EDA, was upgraded to A3 spec with additional armor rated against 14.5 mm AP rounds, spall liners and integrated fire suppression system. Mobility improvemnent with a new 300 hp engine and an automatic transmission. They also donated six Mine armor kit assembly and six complete powerpacks amounting to Php 11 million, all formally received in 2010. As s result the powerpacks enabled the LAD to resurrect another six APCs.

Two views of PALAD's M-113 APC, taken from thw 1990 Independence day parade at the Luneta. Thanks to opus for the pics.

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GKN Defence Land Systems/ Alvis Vickers Ltd. FS.100 'Simba' 4x4 APC/ACV/IFV
Type:
Armored Personnel Carrier/ Armored Combat Vehicle/ Infantry Fighting Vehicle
Country of origin:
United Kingdom
Armor:
8 mm, conventional steel alloy, proof against 7.62 mm AP ammunition
Crew:
[APC] Commander, Driver + 12 Infantry; [ACV/IFV] Commander, Driver + 6 Infantry
Air transportability:
Dimensions
Length:
5.35 m (17.55')
Width:
2.5 m (8.2')
Height:
[APC] 2.19 m (7.2'); [IFV] 2.53 m (8.3')
Ground clearance, hull:
0.45 m (1.48')
Ground clearance, axle:
0.33 m (1.08')
Weights and loadings
Combat weight:
11,200 kg (24,640 lb)
Weight, empty:
9,500 kg (20,943.91 lb)
Power train
Engine:
One 212 bhp (158 kW) Perkins Phaser 210Ti turbocharged V-8 diesel, intercooled, 2,500 rpm, 296 liters fuel capacity
Power-to-weight ratio:
19.43 hp/ton
Transmission:
Clarke 13.7 LHR 28422
Transfer case:
Axles:
Tires:
[APC] 13.00x20 radial tires, run-flat inserts; [IFV] 14.75x80 radial tires, run-flat inserts
Suspension:
Semi-elliptical springs and hydraulic shock dampers at each wheel station.
Performance
Max land speed:
100 kph (62.5 mph) [road]
Water speed:
Acceleration:
Max range:
660 km (410 mi) [road]
Vertical obstacle:
0.45 m (1.47')
Trench:
0.41 m (1.53')
Max fording depth:
1.0 m (3.28')
Gradient:
60%
Side slope:
40%
Turning diameter:
Weapon Systems
Main gun:
[APC] 12.7 mm HMG in 1-m Textron turret; [IFV] Boeing M-242 25 mm Bushmaster chain gun in a Thales (formerly Helio) FVT925 turret
Max effective range:
[APC] 1,800 m; [IFV] 2,460 m
Rate of fire:
[APC] 450 rpm; [IFV] 175 rpm
Ammunition:
[APC] 1,200 rounds
Ammunition type:
[APC] Ball
Rangefinder:
Optical
Night gun sight:
White searchlight
Secondary gun:
Max effective range:
Rate of fire:
Ammunition:
Ammunition type:
Rangefinder:
Night gun sight:
Other defenses:
2 x 66 mm Multi-barreled smoke dischargers
Variants used:
APC variant , IFV 25 mm variant, Ambulance variant
Program:
Designed as a private venture by UK's Alvis (formerly GKN Sankey) for FMS. Developed in 1980 as a complement to the Saxon, with the prototype first produced in 1981 with development continued through the 80's. In 1994, GKN delivered twelve units, with a license to build an additional one hundred thiry-eight units at Php 360,000 each, and were assembled from completely knocked-down units by Asian Armor Vehicles Technologies Corp. (formerly by Philippine International Trading Corp.), actual assembly work was undertaken by Philippine Corp. at its Subic Bay facility with Clark Equipment and Perkins Engines as major subcontractors. Total cost of the deal was $46 million. As a private venture, under this program, GKN exported the bare units which did not include arms and tires, and PITC assembled the parts and added locally made components. It is the only country that uses this APC. The first production units were commissioned in 1991. They were used in operations by the LAD in the South against insurgents, where some units were lost to RPGs. Also utilized by the PSG. A total of 152 units were produced (including Alvis' 2 prototypes). Asian Armor Vehicles Technologies Corp. is Simba's the sole licensed assembler.
Structure: All-welded steel alloy armored monocoque box-shaped hull sloping up to raised driver's position on left side. Engine compartment on right side with louvers on lower part of glacis plate. Horizontal roof extends to rear, vehicle hull rear with large door. Upper part of hull slopes inwards with two-part door in left side of hull and single hatch in right side of hull. Simba which means "Lion" is powered by a Perkins 210Ti turbocharged diesel, intercooled, developing 212 bhp at 2500 rpm, fuel capacity 296 liters (78.72 gallons). A 24V electrical system with two 12V, 90 Ah batteries are fitted. Clark Equipment provided the 13.7 LHR 28422 automatic gearbox with one reverse and four forward gear ratios. A two-gear-ratio transfer case offering a choice of two or four wheel drive is standard, and steering is power assisted. While two wheel drive is available, the Simba is considered to be a four-wheel drive vehicle. Two large road wheels each side, lower part of hull slopes inwards. The suspension system uses semi-elliptical springs and hydraulic shock dampers at each wheel station. The 13.00x20 radial tires are fitted with run-flat inserts. The Simba is considered suitable to tropical and rugged terrain, and can ford up to 1 meter deep water. The driver is seated in front at the left side with the gearbox and engine to the right. The driver is provided with bulletproof windows and a single-piece hatch cover. All automotive components are commercially available. It has three crew members and can transport from ten to twelve infantrymen which can enter and leave through a door at the rear and at the left side. In the basic APC, the commander sits in the middle, slightly above the driver, and is provided with a cupola with four vision blocks. The troop compartment, located to the rear of the vehicle, seats the infantrymen across from one another. Armored vision blocks and firing ports are positioned along the sides of the troop compartment. Normally armed with a 12.7 mm HMG in a manned turret, some IFV variants are also seen with a Boeing M-242 25 mm chain gun mounted in a Thales (formerly Helio) FVT925 turret, (which increases the unit's height to 2.53 m) or the 40 mm AGL/ 12.7 mm HMG combo turret from CIS of Singapore. Other variants available but not used on PA units includes a 90 mm FSV model sporting a Cockerill Mk. 3 90 mm gun, a 81 mm mortar carrier, which can be fitted at the rear of the vehicle, a proposed anti-tank variant sporting BGM-71 TOW, M-901 Improved TOW or the Euromissile with HOT HCT turret and the Internal Security Vehicle variant, which can be fitted with riot screens, barricade removers, PA system and turret with smoke and tear gas launchers. Standard equipment on the Simba includes a fire extinguishing system, run-flat inserts for the tires, a forced air ventilation system, and interior roof insulation. The optional equipment includes air conditioning, an auxiliary power unit, searchlights, a heating system for both the crew compartment and engine, a front-mounted winch, and other specialized internal security equipment. A larger version of the Simba dubbed as the MX-1 Kalakian APC, was developed for the PA which reportedly ordered about 20 units. Some Simba units were seen outfitted as armored ambulances.
Modernization: Proposed SRDP projects in 2002 included the fabrication of view blocks for armored vehicles and tire changer, to be supervised and implemented by the RDC, ASCOM, PA. In August-June 2011, the replication of Modified Armored Vehicle Communication System Project was successfully completed and was presented for test and evaluation with the interfacing of Harris Radio (RF5800V) Handheld into the intercom System and headsets for effective & efficient command and control.

Two views of the FS.100 Simba ACV, the picture in the left serves with the PALAD., while that on the right is with the PSG. Thanks to opus for the pics.

Two more views of the FS.100 Simba ACV, the picture in the left is armed with a 25 mm Bushmaster chain gun., an ambulance variant is shown right. Thanks to opus for the pics.

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Textron Marine & Land Systems Division LAV-300 Mk. 2 'Commando' 6x6
Type:
Armored Personnel Carrier, Wheeled (APC,W)
Country of origin:
USA
Armor:
16 mm max, Cadillac Gage Type 2001 Cadloy high hardness ballistic steel plate, proof against 7.62 mm ball ammunition (vision blocks and periscopes hardened to same level)
Crew:
Commander, Gunner, Driver + 8 Marines
Air transportability:
roll-on/roll-off C-130
Dimensions
Length:
6.7 m (22')
Width:
2.54 m (8.3')
Height, hull:
1.98 m (6.5')
Height, turret roof:
2.7 m (8.86')
Ground clearance, hull:
0.53 m (1.75')
Ground clearance, axle:
0.38 m (1.25')
Wheelbase:
2.21 m (7.25')
Weights and loadings
Basic vehicle weight:
12,292 kg (27,100 lb)
Combat weight:
14,545 kg (31,999 lb)
Power train
Engine:
One Cummins 275 hp QSC 6 CTA 8.3, turbocharged, V-8 diesel engine, 1,900 rpm
Power-to-weight ratio:
18.94 bhp/ton
Transmission:
Allison MD3560, 6-speed
Transfer case:
Single speed, helical gears
Axles:
Single reduction hypoid - silent locking differential
Tires:
14.00R20, run flat inserts
Suspension:
Independent trailing arms with coil springs and shock absorbers
Performance
Max land speed:
105 kph (65 mph) [road]
Water speed:
4.8 kph (3 mph)
Acceleration:
0-32 kph (0-20 mph), 10 sec
Range:
953 km (575 mi)
Vertical obstacle:
0.61 m (2')
Trench:
1.52 m (4.99')
Max fording depth:
1.98 m (6.49')
Gradient:
60%
Side slope:
30%
Turning diameter, nominal:
20 m (68')
Weapon Systems
Main gun:
[FSV] Cockerill Mk.3 90 mm/36 cal rifled gun; [APC] 40 mm AGL
Max effective range:
Rate of fire:
Ammunition:
[FSV] 42 rounds (9 rounds ready)
Ammunition type:
Rangefinder:
Night gun sight:
White searchlight
Secondary gun:
[FSV] 7.62 mm LMG coax, 7.62 mm anti-aircraft LMG; [APC] 12.7 mm HMG coax
Max effective range:
[FSV] 1,100 m; [APC] 1,800 m
Rate of fire:
[FSV] 100 rpm; [APC] 450 rpm
Ammunition:
[FSV] 400 rounds (coax), 200 rounds (anti-aircraft)
Ammunition type:
Rangefinder:
x8 power monocular sight and x1 power periscope for gunner, three vision blocks for commander
Night gun sight:
White searchlight
Other Defenses:
None
Variants used:
V-300 APC, V-300 FSV
Program:
Developed by Textron Marine and Land Systems (formerly Cadillac-Gage) as a private venture to complement their existing LAV-150 4x4 series for FMS. The AFP acquired about twelve V-300 6x6 APC units and twelve V-300 6x6 FSV variant from the US in February 1995 under FMS program and is the PMC's share in the US Bases compensation program (where they were initially offered LVTP-7 in the 80's). All of the AFP's V-300s are assigned to the PMC's Light Armor Vehicle Company (LAV Co), Assault Armor Battalion (AABN), and were extensively used during the height of the 2000 conflict in Mindanao with a confirmed loss of a FSV variant.
Structure: The V-300 is basically a bigger and improved version of the V-150. This 6x6 APC is powered by a Cummins QSC 6 CTA 8.3, turbocharged, after-cooled V-8 diesel engine, developing 275 hp, which can accelerate from 0 to 32 kph under 10 seconds and can travel as fast as 100 kph on roads. Fuel capacity is 200 liters and it can run on Jet A-1, kerosene or other lighter fuels in place of diesel. Driver sits front left, engine compartment to his right, troop compartment extending right to rear. Long box-type hull with pointed front, horizontal hull top and vertical rear. Weapon station normally on hull top in line with second road wheel. Troops enter and leave via twin door in hull rear, each have firing ports and vision blocks above, small door in left side of hull to rear of first wheel station, roof hatches also provided. Six driving wheels (6x6), front wheel steering, with dual hydraulic brakes permits the vehicle to go from 32 kph to 0 in approximately 12 m (40'). Three large road wheels each side with distinctive gap betwwen first and second. Hull sides above road wheels slope inwards. Front axle has solid beam on trailing arms. Rear axles have independent trailing arm with coil springs and one shock absorber. The minimum silhouette hull is constructed of high-hardness ballistic steel plates which can defeat 7.62 mm AP hits in the front, and 7.62 mm ball hits point blank on the side and rear. The survivability is further enhanced from low observable technology to minimize levels of thermal, seismic and audio signatures, and minimal radar return. Optional upgradeable armor floor plating can protect the crew from landmines and hand grenade blasts. It has a crew of three and can carry up to nine infantrymen, which can enter and leave through a rear ramp, which was a modification from the original rear hatch. The V-300 can also ford water through the additional waterjets installed though it can be run by the propeller action of its radial tubeless tires as well. The 6x6 tires are capable of running even when it is punctured and can be optionally outfitted with run-flat inserts and a central tire inflation system, to further enhance mobility. The Marine V-300 also has a trim-vane added but the provisions for the smoke/grenade dischargers and 9,026 kg capacity winch were omitted. The Marines uses the basic APC, with a 12.7 mm HMG and a 7.62 mm coax mounted in a manned 1-m Textron turret, which can traverse 360°, and the fire support Mk. 2 variant, which sports a Cockerill 90 mm gun in a two-man CSE 90 turret, which can power traverse 360° at 30° per second. The front of the FSV's turret can stand up to 14.5 mm hits in the front and up to 7.62 mm hits elsewhere. The FSV variant also has a coaxial 7.62 mm LMG and an additional pintle-mounted 12.7 mm shielded HMG atop the 90 mm's turret.
Modernization: The PMC's APC variants were uprated with the Singaporean company CIS' 40 mm AGL/12.7 mm HMGs coax turret to increase its firepower, with the assistance of FIC of Tanay, Rizal in 2003. The 40 mm AGL can also be interchangeable with a 7.62 mm LMG. The modifications also involved changes in the periscope and vision blocks to enable the gunner to fire highly accurate shots, with a variety of 40 mm AGL ammunition such as HE, Smoke, and FIC's Canister loaded with 300 shotgun pellets for use against close-in ambushes by hostile infantry. It may also be uparmored with additional bolt-on armor and the proposed RPG mesh system to enhance its defensive systems.

Two views of the Marines' V-300, one is the APC variant and the other is the FSV variant sporting a 90 mm gun. Thanks to opus for the pic.

More photos of the Marines' V-300, one is at the left sports a makeshit wooden applique armor, another view of the FSV variant at the right.. Thanks to opus for the pic.

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Gage-Cadillac LAV-150 (M-706) 'Commando' 4x4 APC
Type:
Armored Personnel Carrier, Wheeled (APC,W)
Country of origin:
USA
Armor:
6.4 mm (¼"), Cadloy steel plate protects against 7.62 mm ammunition
Crew:
Commander, Driver + 10 Infantry
Air transportability:
roll-on/roll-off C-130
Dimensions
Length:
5.69 m (18.66')
Width:
2.26 m (7.41')
Height, hull:
1.98 m (6.5')
Height, turret roof:
2.54 m (8.33')
Ground clearance, hull:
0.65 m (2.13')
Ground clearance, axle:
0.38 m (1.25')
Weights and loadings
Weight:
9,545.45 kg (21,000 lb)
Power train
Engine:
One Cummins 6BT5-9 turbocharged diesel engine [uprated];One 191 hp Chrysler V-504 liquid cooled V-8 diesel engine [original]
Power-to-weight ratio:
20:23 hp/metric tonne
Transmission:
5-speed
Transfer case:
Axles:
Tires:
14x20, run flat
Suspension:
Solid beam ale, semi-elliptical multileaf spring suspension with double hydraulic shock absorbers
Performance
Max land speed:
90 kph (56 mph) [road]
Water speed:
5 kph (3 mph)
Acceleration:
Range:
812 km (505 mi)
Vertical obstacle:
0.61 m (2')
Trench:
Max fording depth:

Gradient:
60%
Side slope:
30%
Turning diameter:
Weapon Systems
Main gun:
12.7 mm HMG in 1-m Textron turret
Max effective range:
1,800 m
Rate of fire:
450 rpm
Ammunition:
1,200 rounds
Ammunition type:
Ball
Rangefinder:
M-20 gunsights
Night gun sight:
White searchlight
Secondary gun:
7.62 mm LMG coax
Max effective range:
1,100 m
Rate of fire:
100 rpm
Ammunition:
Ammunition type:
Rangefinder:
Night gun sight:
White searchlight
Other Defenses:
2 x Multibarrel smoke dischargers
Variants used:
V-100, V-150, V-150ST, Ambulance, ARV
Program:
Designed by in 1962 by Textron Marine and Land Systems (formerly Cadillac-Gage) as a reconnaissance vehicle, convoy escort, command, patrol and riot control platform, it saw service during the Vietnam war, designated as V-100. In 1971 it was replaced in production by the LAV-150 and used for FMS with about 3,000 in service to foreign armies. In 1985, LAV-150S was the new production model with a loger wheelbase and greater weight. The AFP has about 165 units delivered including several older V-100s and 10 V-150S delivered in 1994, and are in service to the LAD, PNP-SAF, PSG and PMC's Light Armor Vehicle Company (LAV Co). It is arguably the most common armored vehicle used by the PA from the 70's up to the late 90's, but is now being superceded by the Simba ACV.
Structure: The V-100 is equipped with four-wheel drive and uses axles similar to the ones used in the M-34 series of trucks. The engine is a gasoline-powered 361 cubic inch Chrysler V-8, (same as in the early gas models of the M113 APCs). Its 5-speed manual transmission allows it to traverse relatively rough terrain. The armor consists of high hardness alloy steel called Cadaloy, which protects against projectiles up to 7.62 x 51 mm. Partly because of its armor, the M706 has an unloaded mass of over 7 tons. As a result, a common problem with the vehicle is rear axle failure caused by the extreme weight. The V-100 carries a maximum crew of 12. Standard armament included two or three top-mounted M-60 machine-guns. Passengers could also use their personal weapons to fire through the vehicle's various gun ports. The V-100 was available in turret and open-top models. The LAV-150, repowered by a Chrysler liquid cooled V-8 diesel engine, located on the left side at rear, developing 191 hp, with a five-speed transmission, giving the vehicle a maximum cruising speed of 90 kph on four 14 x 20 run flat tires, which can still run 45 kph for about 150 kilometers after being punctured. The vehicle has a range of 643 kilometers on its 303 liters fuel capacity. It is fully amphibious, needing no special preparation and can ford streams and lakes at 5 kph from the propeller action of its tires. Pointed hull front with horizontal roofs, hull sides above curved wheel arches slope inwards, hull back cut off top and bottom and point to rear. Commander and driver sits at front with troop compartment extending to rear except for engine compartment left rear. Four wheels powered (4x4), with front wheels steering and solid beam ale, semi-elliptical multileaf spring suspension with double hydraulic shock absorbers. Two large raod wheel each side with two-part hatch between, similar hatch right rear, armament mounted on hull roof center of the vehicle. It has a crew of two and can carry eleven infantrymen. Its quarter inch thick armor can defeat up to .30 caliber at point blank range. Optional 3/8" armor can withstand .50 cal round hits. The V-150 is available in various configurations, including command, recovery, mortar, TOW, air defense vehicles, and armored personnel carrier. A variety of armament stations can be installed, including most light and medium automatic weapons, missile systems, mortars, and cannons up to 90 mm. Main armament options used in the AFP for the V-150 includes 2 x 7.62 mm (800 rounds ready, 3000 in hull), and 2 x 12.7 mm (400 rounds ready , 1,000 in hull). Other variants includes 1 x 20 mm Oerlikon (200 rounds ready, 200 in hull), or 1 x 25 mm (200 rounds ready, 200 in hull), or 1 x 12.7 mm MG and 40 mm AGL, or 1 x 90 mm (8 rounds ready 31 in hull), or 1 x 81 mm mortar (62 rounds in hull). The AFP Logistics Command also developed two, local prototype version of the V-150 called the Hari-Digma, which has a US-made engine and locally manufactured components.
Modernization: Some twelve units of V-150s were upgraded in 1998 to V-150ST, where they have extended rear compartments and turbocharged engines. In 2006 some of the PMC's V-150's have installed additional rear 12.7 mm HMG mounts taken from decommissioned units. Gage-Cadillac Textron undertook the Light Armor System Upgrade (LARSU) in 2004, which involved the mobility upgrade of twelve units of V-150 APCs by refitting the power train with 6-cylinder in-line internal combustion engines, for Php 170.88 million. The PMC's own LARSU Phase I project conceptualized as far back as 1994, started on August 2006 and completed in July 2007, with Textron Marine & Land Systems Division as the prime contractor to be done in Laguna. Under this program the Marine's V-150 Chrysler diesel engines will be uprated to the Cummins turbocharged diesel engines (similar to those in the V-300s), which will require the cutting and extension of the rear hull. Also included in the powerpack are new Allison transmission, transfer case, cooling system and electrical modifications Furthermore the old engines are planned to be reconfigured and installed on four idle V-200 Chaimite APC, to be reconfigured as ambulances and mortar carriers, if funds are allocated. The V-150 maybe also be considered for additional bolt-on armor (some units were seen with improvised wooden appliqué armors to predetonate RPG warheads in the Mindanao campaigns) and the proposed PMC RPG mesh system.

Two photos of Marine V-150, the left pic have an additional 12.7 mm HMG mount. Thanks to opus for the pic, Manokski and mblt6 for the infos.

Two photos of V-150S, note the extended hulls. Thanks to opus for the pic.

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GKN Sankey/ Alvis Vehicles Ltd. FV.432 Mk.2
Type:
Armored Mortar Carrier, Tracked (APC,T)
Country of origin:
United Kingdom
Armor:
6-12 mm (max) steel alloy
Crew:
Cmdr, Driver (+ 10 Infantry)
Air transportability:
Dimensions
Length:
5.251 m (17.23')
Width:
2.8 m (9.19')
Height, overall:
2.286 m (7.5')
Height, hull:
1.879 m (6.16')
Ground clearance:
0.406 m (1.36')
Ground pressure:
0.79 kg/cm² (11.2 psi)
Weights and loadings
Combat weight:
15,280 kg (33,686.63 lb)
Weight, empty:
13,740 kg (30,291.51 lb)
Power train
Engine:
1 x 240 bhp (179 kW) Rolls Royce K60 No.4 Mk. 4F 2 stroke, 6-cylinder multifuel, 3,750 rpm, 454 liter (120 gallon) fuel capacity
Power-to-weight ratio:
15.7 bhp/tonne
Transmission:
Transfer case:
Axles:
Tracks:
Suspension:
Torsion-bar, Five road wheels, drive sprocket front, idler rear, two-track return rollers.
Performance
Max Land Speed:
52.2 kph (32.43 mph) [road]
Water speed:
6 kph (3.73 mph) [with preparation]
Acceleration:
Range:
[diesel] 480 km (298.26 mi); [gas] 424 km (263 mi)
Vertical obstacle:
0.609 m (2')
Trench:
2.05 m (6.72')
Max fording depth:
[no preparation] 1.066 m (3.51'); [with preparation] Amphibious
Gradient:
60%
Side slope:
30 %
Turning diameter:
Weapon Systems
Main gun:
L16 81 mm mortar
Max effective range:
5,660 m (18,570')
Rate of fire:
Traverse:
360°
Ammunition:
160 rds
Ammunition type:
Rangefinder:
Secondary gun:
7.62 mm GPMG
Max effective range:
Rate of fire:
Ammunition:
Ammunition type:
Rangefinder:
Night gun sight:
Passive (Driver)
Other defenses:
Two three-barrel smoke dischargers/ NBC equipment
Program:
The FV.430 series was developed to meet the requirements of the British Army in the late 50's, with the first prototype completed in 1961. Production undertaken by Alvis Vehicles (formerly GKN Sankey) with over 3,000 units built by end production in 1972. The FV.432 is the APC in the FV.430 series, and the most common variant used for transporting infantry, though were gradually used in supporting/reserve roles since the 80's. The Mk.1 have gasoline engines, the Mk. 2, Rolls-Royce K60 multi-fuel engine and the Mk.3 'Bulldog' which are the most recent upgrades have diesel engines, new steering unit and braking system, enhanced reactive armor and IED jammers, was made by BAE Systems Land Systems, for use by the British Army in Iraq. The LAD's lone FV.432 was acquired through a Deed of Donation from the United Auctioneer's, Inc. on 17 May 2011. The vehicle will be utilized as mortar carrier, like its other variant. An 81 mm L16 mortar will be mounted in the rear of the hull on a turntable which can be traversed through a full 360°. The mortar has a maximum range of 5,660 m and 160 mortar bombs can be carried.
Structure:
All welded steel hull with engine front left, driver front right, gunner and hatch to his rear. Troop compartment rear with four-part circular roof hatch above, two-parts opening left and right. Troops seat on bench seats, five each side facing, which can fold to provide a flat cargo space. Glacis plate slopes at about 60° with horizontal hull roof extending to rear, vertical hull rear with large door opening left. Vertical hull sides with exhaust pipes on left side and NBC pack portuding on right side. Wading screen and a trim vane, standard. Suspension each side has five road wheels, drive sprocket front, idler rear, two-track return rollers. Upper part sometimes coverd by skirt.

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Ingersoll/Pacific Car and Foundry Co. LVTH-6
Type:
Landing Vehicle, Tracked, Howitzer
Country of origin:
USA
Armor:
6.4-16 mm rolled homogenous steel
Crew:
Commander, Gunner, Driver, Loader, Crew chief + 2 Ammunition passers
Air transportability:
Dimensions
Length:
9.04 m (30')
Width:
3.57 m (11.71')
Height, over AAMG:
4.08 m (13.38')
Tread:
2.96 m (9.725')
Ground clearance:
0.43 m (1.42')
Ground pressure, zero penetration:
0.64 kg/cm² (9.1 psi)
Weights and loadings
Combat weight:
39,300 kg (86,600 lb)
Weight, amphibious:
38,200 kg (84,200 lb)
Power train
Engine:
One 704 hp Continental LV-1790-1, 4 stroke, 12-cylinder 90° gasoline, 810 hp at 2,800 rpm
Power-to-weight ratio:
19 hp/ton
Transmission:
Allison CD-850-4A or -4B, 2 ranges forward, 1 reverse
Transfer case:
Axles:
Tracks:
Center guide, single pin, steel with inverted grouser
Suspension:
Torsilastic type. Nine pairs of dual/track road wheels. Five dual/track return rollers. Seventeen-tooth rear drive sprockets. Dual compensating idlers at front of track. No shock absorbers
Performance
Max land speed:
48.3 kph (30 mph)
Water speed:
11 kph (6.8 mph)
Acceleration:
Range, cruising:
[road] 306 km (190 mi); [water] 92 km (57 mi)
Vertical obstacle:
0.91 m ( 3')
Trench:
3.66 m (12')
Max fording depth:
Floats
Gradient:
70%
Side slope:
60%
Turning diameter:
Weapon Systems
Main gun:
M-49 105 mm in T-172 mount
Max effective range:
Rate of fire:
Elevation:
-4.1° to +59° (manual, stabilized)
Traverse:
360° (at 21°/sec, manual or hydraulic)
Ammunition:
151 rounds (12 rounds ready)
Ammunition type:
Rangefinder:
Night gun sight:
Secondary gun:
M-1919A4E1 7.62 mm coax MG
Max effective range:
Rate of fire:
Ammunition:
Ammunition type:
Rangefinder:
Night gun sight:
None
Other defenses:
M-2 HB 12.7 mm roof HMG
Variants used:
LVTH-6
Program:
First saw service in 1957 and well into the Vietnam war, where about 210 LVTH-6 variant were produced. The LVTH-6 (Howitzer) variant were used as fire support vehicles (FSV) during the early Mindanao campaigns in the 1970's (and thus does not carry additional personnel other than its crew). The PMC currently has four fully-operational LVTH-6A1s and about five in reserve. These units are utilized by the PMC's Assault Amphibian Vehicle Company (AAV Co), Assault Armor Battalion (AABN).
Structure: Basically the same as the LVTP-5, with identical hulls and specs, but the H-6 model armed with a short barreled 105 mm howitzer mounted on a traversing turret, over the cargo compartment, capable of both direct, indirect and high angle fire. The commander seats in the rear, right, the gunner at the rear, front, with the loader at the rear, left, the driver at the left, front, the crew chief in front, right. The commander and loader have their own hatches in the turret. For amphibious operations weight is reduced by having only 51 rounds of ammunition. The turret has 25 mm front armor, 19 mm on the sides and 7 mm on the top. They also have an additional .30 cal coaxial LMG and a 12.7 mm pintle-mounted HMG atop the turret. In 2005 the PMC have brought back two additional units and will be utilized as Urban Fire Support Vehicles by the Marine Ready Force (MRF) based in Manila. They have additional frontal armor (and about 580 kg of extra weight) but their amphibious capabilities were initially not restored, fuel lines were also reinforced as well as some other internal modifications. Both sport the Berlin Brigade camouflage, similar to the one used by armored units of the PSG. A fifth LVT is being brought to operational status by reservists lacks the 105 mm gun and is an E1 (Engineer, model 1) version. It will be mounted with an Oerlikon Mk.4 20 mm/70 and will be used as an anti-aircraft platform and to ram road blocks. A sixth LVT is under consideration pending its role. A recent amphibious exercise in General Santos revived the Navy's interest in having an amphibious capability. The operational LVTs will have rubber linings and bilge pumps re-installed to reincorporate its amphibious functions, though its add-on armor may pose some weight and buoyancy problems, which may be compensated by the LVTH-6 having a lower ammunition load. This is why the PMC have reactivated some LARC-Vs to compensate for the lessened ammunition load of the LVTH-6s.

Photo of a Marine Ready Force's LVTH-6A1, with additional frontal armor. Thanks to opus for the pic, Manokski and mblt6 for the infos.

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