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GROUND WEAPONS (Support Vehicles)

Back | M-998 | M-151 | Jeep | KM-450 | KM-250 | M-35A2 Guntruck | Aquatruck | LARC-V

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AM General M-998/M-1025 'Humvee' (HMMWV)
Type:
High Mobility Multi Purpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV)
Country of origin:
USA
Armor:
Crew:
Driver + [M998] 4 Passengers
Air transportability:
roll-on/roll-off C-130
Dimensions
Length:
4.573 m (15')
Width:
2.16 m (7.08')
Height:
1.75 m (5.74') ;[M-1025] 1.85 m (6')
Ground clearance:
Weights and loadings
Weight:
2,359 kg (5,190 lb)
Power train
Engine:
One 150 bhp General Motors V-8 6.2-liters fuel-injected diesel, liquid cooled, compression ignition, at 3,600 rpm, naturally aspirated
Power-to-weight ratio:
Transmission:
Allison three-speed, automatic transmission
Transfer case:
Axles:
Tracks:
Suspension:
Performance
Max land speed:
90 kph (56 mph)
Water speed:
Acceleration:
Range:
563 km (350 mi)
Vertical obstacle:
Trench:
Max fording depth:
0.76 m (2.5')
Gradient:
60%
Side slope:
40%
Turning diameter:
Weapon Systems
Main gun:
12.7 mm M-2 HMG or 60 mm M-5 Light Mortar or 106 mm M-40-A1 Recoilless rifle
Max effective range:
[12.7 mm] 1,800 m
Rate of fire:
[12.7 mm] 450 rpm
Ammunition:
[12.7 mm] 1,200 rounds
Ammunition type:
[12.7 mm] Ball
Rangefinder:
Night gun sight:
None
Other defenses:
Variants used:
M-998 Cargo/Troop, M-1025 Armament Carrier, M-997 Armored Maxi-Ambulance
Program:
Developed by AM General in 1979 and first entered service in 1985, with about 55,000 Humvees produced to this date. The High Mobility Multi-purpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV), popularly called Humvee is the replacement vehicle for the M-151 series jeeps. Its primary purpose is to provide a light tactical vehicle for various purposes and for mounting of various weapons platforms across all areas of a modern battlefield. The basic Humvee cost about $56,000, and should not be confused with the civilian Hummer H1 sold by General Motors. The AFP initially received about 1,000 HMMWVs through FMS in the late 80's, and were distributed across the major commands and the PNP, with most being in use by the GHQ, the PA and the PMC. Twenty-three units of the ambulance variant acquired in 2011, which are equipped with life-support systems to provide immediate medical response to life-threatening combat casualty personnel before they are transported to medical treatment facilities.
Structure: The 4x4 Humvee, the current world standard in military trucks, is powered by a high-performance water-cooled diesel engine with a 95 liters (25 gallons) fuel capacity, Allison three-speed, automatic transmission, four wheel drive, power-steering with a two-speed, locking, chain driven transfer case. Brakes are of hydraulic four-wheeled disc type and the engine fan is of clutch-type, engine-driven. The Humvee is both air-transportable and air-droppable from different type of fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft. Electrical system consist of 24V 60A, negative ground-type. Depending on the model, the Humvee can be equipped with a self-recovery winch capable of supporting payloads up to 2,000 kg (4,400 lb), and a 2,727 kg (6,000 lb) 1:1 ratio line pull capacity and supplemental armor plating. The AFP uses several variants - the M-1025/M-1026/M-1043 HMMWVs, Armament Carrier configuration, which re equipped with basic armor and a variety of weapons mount, located on the roof of the vehicle, either the M-60 7.62 mm machine-gun, the M-2 .50 caliber machine-gun, the Mk. 19 grenade launcher or the M-5 81 mm mortar. The weapons platform can be traversed 360. It can also carry communications equipment instead of various weapons systems. The Humvee can climb 60% slopes and traverse a side slope of up to 40% fully loaded. The vehicles can ford hard bottom water crossing up to 0.76 meters without a deep water fording kit. The other versions, M-998/M-1038 Humvee are Cargo/Troop carrier and are used to transport equipment, materials, and/or personnel with a payload (including crew) of 1,136 kg (2,500 lb) and the troop carrier is capable of transporting a two man crew and eight passengers. Both use a troop seat kit for troop transport operations. The cargo/troop carrier can also be configured in a four man crew configuration. Though successful as a troop transport, it was never designed to be an APC, thereby it offers its passengers very little protection from small-arms fire. Foreign field reports indicate that additional improvised armor may do more harm than good for it strains the suspension and drivetrain components by the added weight.
Modernization: Some Marine units sports improvised armor of various configurations from decommissioned LVTP-5s.

Two photos of M-998 HMMWV, the left one is a Marine "hardened" Humvee version. Thanks to Manokski for the pic and info.

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Ford/ AM General M-151A1C 'Kennedy' 4x4 Recoilless Rifle Carrier Jeep
Type:
Multi Utility Tactical Truck (MUTT)
Country of origin:
USA
Armor:
None
Crew:
Driver + 3 Passengers
Air transportability:
roll-on/roll-off C-130
Dimensions
Length:
3.38 m (11.09')
Width:
1.62 m (5.31')
Height:
1.8 m (5.9') [top up]; 1.35 m (4.43')
Ground clearance:
Weights and loadings
Weight:
1,070 kg (2,400 lb)
Power train
Engine:
One 71 hp (52 kW) 4-cylcle engine 2,320 cc at 4000 rpm
Power-to-weight ratio:
Transmission:
Transfer case:
Axles:
Tracks:
Suspension:
Independent swing axle rear suspension with coil springs [A1]; Semi-trailing arm suspension with coil springs [A2]
Performance
Max land speed:
442 km (275 mph)
Water speed:
Acceleration:
Range:
Vertical obstacle:
Trench:
Max fording depth:
Gradient:
Side slope:
Turning diameter:
Weapon Systems
Main gun:
12.7 mm HMG or M-40-A1 106 mm Recoilless Rifle
Max effective range:
1,800 m [12.7 mm]
Rate of fire:
450 rpm [12.7 mm]
Ammunition:
1,200 rounds [12.7 mm]; 6 rounds [M-40]
Ammunition type:
[12.7 mm] Ball
Rangefinder:
.50 cal spotting rifle [M-40-A1]
Night gun sight:
Variants used:
Utility, RR carrier, MG carrier, Ambulance, Mobile Communications
Program:
In 1951 Ford Motor Company was awarded the contract to design a ton 4x4 Multi-Utility Tactical Truck (MUTT) to replace the M-38 and M-38A1 model jeeps. The M-151 was developed with guidance from the US Army's Ordnance Truck Automotive Command. Design started in 1951, production from 1959 through 1982 and served in the Vietnam War and up to the late 90's. Although the M-151 was developed and initially produced by Ford, production contracts for the M-151A2 were later also awarded to Kaiser Jeep and AM General Corp.
Although the M151 mostly retained the same basic layout and dimensions of its predecessors, it was for all intents and purposes a completely new design. Unlike previous jeep designs, whose structure consisted of a steel tub bolted onto a separate steel frame, the M151 utilized a monocoque design, which integrated the box frame rails into the sheet-steel body-structure. Eliminating the separate frame gave the M-151 slightly more ground clearance, while at the same time lowering the center of gravity. This process slightly enlarged the vehicle, making it roomier than previous jeep designs, while retaining the same light weight.
Another area improved upon in the M151 was the suspension. Dispensing with the rigid live axles in the front and rear that all previous military jeeps used (a layout still used on modern day Jeeps, such as the Jeep CJ and Wrangler prior to the 1997 TJ), the M-151 was instead equipped with independent suspension and coil springs. This made it capable of high-speed, cross-country travel, while boasting high maneuverability and agility. The new suspension also had the added benefit of providing a more comfortable ride. At high road speed, the rear suspension in a lightly loaded MUTT had a tendency to tuck under the vehicle during turns, causing it to roll. The vehicle's tendency to roll over was reduced when there was weight in the rear, so drivers would often place an ammunition box filled with sand under the rear seat when no other load was being carried. The box could simply be emptied or abandoned when the extra weight was not needed.
Due to copyright and trademark issues, the M-151 did not feature Jeep's distinctive seven vertical slot grille, instead, a horizontal grille was used.
Versions: M151 (1960) Initial version. Because of its rear suspension design it had a dangerous tendency to flip over when cornered too aggressively by unaware drivers. The coil spring and swing-axle rear suspension lay-out (similar to the rear suspension of the VW Beetle) could result in big rear wheel camber changes, causing drastic oversteer and a subsequent roll-over. M151A1 (1964) Second version. minor changes in the rear suspension, mostly aimed at allowing the vehicle to carry heavier loads. Addition of turn signals to front fenders. The essentials of the rear suspension remained unchanged and the same applies to the handling problems in corners. The M151A1C equipped with a 106 mm recoilless rifle on a pedestal-mount. Capable of carrying six rounds of ammunition and weapon tools. Including the driver, it provides space for two men. M718, Front-line ambulance variant. M151A2 (1970), the A2 fielded a significantly revised rear suspension that greatly improved safety in fast cornering. The MUTT now had Semi-trailing arm suspension comparable to what most late 80's premium German cars had. Many smaller upgrades including improved turn signals. The A2 can be identified by the large combination turn signal/blackout lights on the front fenders, which also had been modified to mount the larger lights, as opposed to earlier A1's that had flat front fenders. Continuing problems with vehicle roll-overs into the 1980s led the US military to retrofit many M151 series vehicles with the "Roll over protection structure" (ROPS), a roll cage intended to protect both front and rear seat passengers.
The M-151 jeep is one of the workhorse utility vehicles of the AFP, received through FMS, from surplus US stocks, initially gasoline-powered, but converted to diesels by the Logistics Command, it is sometimes armed with a variety of machine-gun mounts, it can also carry the M-40-A1 106 mm recoilless rifle on a M-79 rifle mount to support infantry units against hardened targets such as bunkers and hostile APCs. It has a magazine fed .50 caliber spotting gun attached to aid in aiming the weapon. The weapon can be depressed at -11 and elevated to +11. The M-151 is also capable of carrying communications equipment to provide C over field units. It may carry any of the following all-weather, all-terrain radios - VHF/AM (Air traffic control communication transceiver); UHF/AM (Military tactical communication transceiver); VHF/AM (air-to-ground communications transceiver URC-777 with AMP 50-RF booster); HF/SSB (Single sideband communications transceiver URC-187 with LA-100-RF booster). Power supply for the communications gear is a Vetronix PS-20C, with an auxiliary power unit gas-driven, air-cooled generator supplying 4 kW.

Photos of Marine M-151 jeeps sporting M-40-A1 106 mm recoilless rifle.

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KIA M-450 4x4
Type:
Light Utility Vehicle
Country of origin:
South Korea
Crew:
Driver + 13 Infantry
Air transportability:
roll-on/roll-off C-130
Dimensions
Length:
5.4 m (17.72')
Width:
2.18 m (7.15')
Height:
2.5 m (8.2')
Ground clearance:
Weights and loadings
Weight:
3.1 tons
Power train
Engine:
One 139 hp D4DA diesel engine
Power-to-weight ratio:
Transmission:
Manual
Transfer case:
Axles:
Tracks:
Suspension:
Performance
Max land speed:
105 kph (64.62 mph)
Water speed:
Acceleration:
Range:
880 km (546.81 mi)
Vertical obstacle:
~0.5 m (1.64')
Trench:
~0.5 m (1.64')
Max fording depth:
0.76 m (2.49')
Gradient:
60%
Side slope:
40%
Turning diameter:
Weapon Systems
Main gun:
Max effective range:
Rate of fire:
Ammunition:
Ammunition type:
Rangefinder:
Night gun sight:
Variants used:

Program:
The Kia KM-450 is a light 4x4 multi-purpose all-terrain military truck. It is a modern license-produced version of the US M-715 (designed in the mid-1960s). Despite similar appearance to the M-715, the KM-450 series trucks are different in a number of areas, including mechanical systems. The Kia KM450 military truck features a sturdy full grille guard to protect the front from damage. The KM-450 was first introduced in 1998. This military vehicle is in service with ROK Army and has been exported to some countries. The baseline version is a troop/cargo carrier. It offers substantially more room and hauling capacity, than the smaller Kia KM-420. This military vehicle has a payload capacity of 1,530 kg on hard surface roads and 1,330 kg on cross-country terrain. It can also tow light trailers or artillery pieces. The cab of the KM-450 accommodates a driver and one passenger. It has an open top, covered with canvas cover. The windshield can be folded down for added combat versatility. The slated cargo body walls also serve as troop seats when folded down, accommodating up to 12 fully-armed troops. Troop/cargo area is covered with removable bows and canvas cover. Can be fitted with a basic armor kit. The AFP acquired 651 units KIA M-450 1 ton troop carriers from Hyundai Corp. and KIA Motors of South Korea for Php 1,421.855 million, with the first delivery on December 2007, all with Integrated Logistics support.

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Willys-Overland/ Ford Motor Corp. MB Jeep 4x4
Type:
Light Utility Vehicle
Country of origin:
USA
Crew:
Driver + 3 Infantry
Air transportability:
roll-on/roll-off C-130
Dimensions
Length:
3.3 m (10.83')
Width:
1.57 m (5.17')
Height:
1.32 m (4.33')
Ground clearance:
Weights and loadings
Weight:
1,400 kg (3,086 lb)
Power train
Engine:
One 60 hp (45 kW) Four cylinder, 2,200 cc engine at 4,000 rpm
Power-to-weight ratio:
Transmission:
3-speed + reverse T-84 transmission
Transfer case:
2-speed Model 18 transfer case
Axles:
Tracks:
Suspension:
Performance
Max land speed:
104 kph (65 mph)
Water speed:
Acceleration:
Range:
485 km (301 mi)
Vertical obstacle:
Trench:
Max fording depth:
Gradient:

Side slope:

Turning diameter:
Weapon Systems
Main gun:
Max effective range:
Rate of fire:
Ammunition:
Ammunition type:
Rangefinder:
Night gun sight:
Variants used:

Program:


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KIA M-250 6x6 Truck
Type:
Light Utility Truck
Country of origin:
South Korea
Crew:
Driver + 20 Infantry
Air transportability:
roll-on/roll-off C-130
Dimensions
Length:
6.78 m (22.24')
Width:
2.43 m (7.97')
Height:
2.84 m (9.32')
Ground clearance:
Weights and loadings
Weight:
6.17 tons
Power train
Engine:
One 180 hp KK-7.4 diesel engine
Power-to-weight ratio:
Transmission:
Transfer case:
Axles:
Tracks:
Suspension:
Performance
Max land speed:
95 kph (59 mph)
Water speed:
Acceleration:
Range:
955 km (593.41 mi)
Vertical obstacle:
Trench:
Max fording depth:
0.76 m (2.49')
Gradient:
60%
Side slope:
Turning diameter:
Weapon Systems
Main gun:
Max effective range:
Rate of fire:
Ammunition:
Ammunition type:
Rangefinder:
Night gun sight:
Variants used:

Program:
The KM-250 is a baseline model for Kia's 6x6 tactical truck series. It is an updated US M-35A2 truck, produced by the Kia Motors. Vehicle retains a classic American military truck appearance with the long bonnet, spartan soft-topped cab, and a large carrying area. It is in service with the ROK Army. The KM-250 has a payload capacity of 2,270 kg off road and 4,550 kg on hard surface roads. It can carry up to 20 fully equipped troops, plus the crew of two. The removable slated body walls serve as troop seats when folded down. The canvas top and supporting structure can be removed from both the cab and cargo body. The windshield can be also folded for maximum versatility. This South Korean military truck is also used to tow trailers or artillery pieces, such as the 105-mm field howitzer. On December 2010, the AFP has received a total of 20 units (out of the 250 total for both PA and PAF) M-250 2 ton Troop Carriers with the second batch of 115 units are scheduled to arrive January 2011, the third batch of 115 units on February 2011, all with Integrated Logistics support.

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REO Motor Car Co./ AM General/ Kaiser M-35A2 6x6 Truck
Type:
Armed 6x6 Utility Vehicle
Country of origin:
USA
Armor:
Rolled homogenous steel plates (PMC guntrucks only)
Crew:
Driver + ? Infantry
Air transportability:
roll-on/roll-off C-130
Dimensions
Length:
7 m (22.97')
Width:
2.4 m (7.87')
Height:
2.84 m (9.32')
Ground clearance:
Weights and loadings
Weight, empty:
5,910 kg (13,029 lb)
Power train
Engine:
One 130 hp LDS-465-1 Multifuel turbo engine
Power-to-weight ratio:
Transmission:
5-speed manual transmission
Transfer case:
Divorced 2-speed transfer case
Axles:
Tracks:
Suspension:
Performance
Max land speed:
88.51kph (55 mph)
Water speed:
Acceleration:
Range:
724 km (450 mi)
Vertical obstacle:
Trench:
Max fording depth:
Gradient:
Side slope:
Turning diameter:
Weapon Systems
Main gun:
12.7 mm HMG
Max effective range:
1,800 m
Rate of fire:
450 rpm
Ammunition:
1,200 rounds
Ammunition type:
Ball
Rangefinder:
Optical
Night gun sight:
None
Variants used:
Command carrier, Dump truck, Water carrier, Vehicle Recovery
Program:
Thousands of M-35 6x6 trucks (and variants) were received through FMS from surplus US stocks and serve as general transports through the years. Recent acquisitions includes 300 units M-35A2, accepted on 30 June 2000 through grant from US EDA. The M-35 started out in 1949 as a design by the REO Motor Car Company as a 2 ton truck that was later nicknamed the deuce and a half. The first vehicle in the family, the M-34, was quickly superseded in military usage by the M-35, the major difference being the M-35's 10-tire configuration versus the M-34's 6-tire "super-singles" configuration. The M-35 has a payload capacity of 2,300 kg off road and 4,500 kg on hard surface roads. The standard wheelbase cargo bed is 2.4 m by 3.6 m (8' x 12'). The M-35A2 is available with a canvas soft top.
The gasoline-powered deuces were built primarily by REO Motors, however, Studebaker also had a manufacturing contract from at least 1951 up into the early 1960s. Curtis-Wright also had a contract in at least 1958 to build deuce dump trucks with the Continental gas engine. The A1's had Continental LDS-427-2 non-turbo, and 5th gear was an overdrive. The engines were not reliable nor powerful. A2 trucks received the LDS-465-1 Multifuel turbo engines, keeping the OD transmission of the A1s. Through the years the trucks were upgraded to LDT (turbo clean air)-465-1A, B, C. The turbo was added more to clean up the very black exhaust on the Non Turbo engines, than to add power, the HP was only raised from 130 to 135 HP. The LDT-465 D was the last version of the Multi Fuel, it had a Quieter Turbo (non whistler) better head gasket sealing and head cooling.
Brake system is air-assisted-hydraulic six wheel drum with a driveline parking brake, although gladhands exist on the rear of the vehicle for connection to trailers with full air service and emergency brakes. Braking performance of the truck is similar to other power drum brake vehicles of this size. Each drum was designed with maximum efficiency in mind, and individual drums can dissipate up to 16 hp (12 kW) of braking heat. Due to this brake system and GVWR under 11,794 kg (26,001 lb), the big deuce can be driven without a commercial driver's license in most states. Even California does NOT require a CDL to operate an M-35 on public roads because even though it has three axles and an air-assisted braking system, the maximum gross weight is still under 12,000 kg (26,000 lb), making it eligible for class C on-road driving; and because the primary braking system is hydraulic, not air. The electrical system is 24 V, using two 12 V 6TL-series military grade batteries run in series. Some deuces are equipped with a 4,500 kg (10,000 lb) PTO-driven front winch manufactured by Garwood.
The curb weight of an M35 is between 5,900 kg (13,000 lb) and 7,300 kg (16,000 lb) empty, depending on configuration (cargo, wrecker, tractor, etc.). Its top speed is 90 kph (56 mph), though maximum cruising speed is approximately 77 kph (48 mph). Fuel economy is 11 mpg-US (21 L/100 km; 13 mpg-imp) highway and 8 mpg-US (29 L/100 km; 9.6 mpg-imp) city, giving the deuce a 600–800 km (400-500-mile) range on its 190 L (50 US gallons; 42 Imp gal) single fuel tank.
The PMC's 6th Marine Battalion Landing Team initially converted a 2 M-35 truck, which was uparmored with add-on armor from salvaged hull plates from decommissioned LVTP-5, thereby creating a hardened and protected convoy vehicle dubbed as "Talisman". As it was successful in saving infantry's lives in the field, the PMC started hardening of fifteen other M-35 trucks to serve as additional armored transports in the South. Unlike the prototype Guntruck, the armor of the new Guntrucks are brand new and are not salvaged from the old LVTP-5s, also they are welded or bolted in place. The two-layer armor can withstand up to 7.62 mm ball and AP ammunition. The armor configurations vary and are usually located in the side and the rear with the top left open. Machine-guns can be mounted along the sides of the truck. The PMC plans to deploy about two Guntrucks to each deployed Marine battalion. The PMC plans to deploy about two Guntrucks per deployed Marine battalion.
The PMC had also begun the creation of an anti-aircraft unit by 2006, utilizing M-35 based vehicles. Two types of vehicles have been seen so far. One utilizes the Mk 51 tub mount from the decommissioned Swift Mk.1 boats, with two M2 Browning 12.7 mm HMG, while the other features another former naval mount, a single Oerlikon 20 mm cannon.

Photos of a Marine M-35 "hardened" Guntrucks, notice the different armor configurations. Thanks to Manokski and mblt6 for the pic and info.

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GKN Defence Limited Aquatrack (LCP)
Type:
Amphibious Vehicle (LCP)
Country of origin:
United Kingdom
Armor:
Crew:
2
Air transportability:
Dimensions
Length:
9.21 m (30.22')
Width:
3.20 m (10.5')
Height:
3.15 m (10.33')
Ground clearance:
Weights and loadings
Weight:
Power train
Engine:
1 x 315 bhp Deutz BF8L513 diesel; 2 CP props
Power-to-weight ratio:
Transmission:
Transfer case:
Axles:
Tracks:
Suspension:
Performance
Max Land Speed:
40 kph
Water speed:
Acceleration:
Range:
500 km
Vertical obstacle:
Trench:
Max fording depth:
Gradient:
Side slope:
Turning diameter:
Weapon Systems
Main gun:
Max effective range:
Rate of fire:
Ammunition:
Ammunition type:
Rangefinder:
Night gun sight:
Variants used:
Program:
Designed and produced by GKN Limited, actually owned by the DND, Office of Civil Defense (OCD), these tracked, amphibious vehicles are operated the PMC for Mt. Pinatubo Rescue Team, and are utilized for disaster relief operations throughout the country. They are designed to transport payloads from off-shore vessels. The design of the tracks are derived from the US Army's MRLS, and is equipped with a propeller for increased water speed. Running gear duplicates that of an M-113 APC and the tracks contribute to afloat propulsion. Able to beach through 3 m seas. Can operate in Sea State 5. Has a 4.3 x 2.6 m open cargo deck and stern ramp aft capable of carrying 5 tons of cargo or a light truck.

Photos of the DND-OCD Aquatrack, utilized by the PMC.

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LARC-V (Light, Amphibious, Resupply, Cargo Vehicle)
Type:
4x4 Amphibious Vehicle
Country of origin:

Armor:
Serrated aluminum
Crew:
Air transportability:
Dimensions:
Length:
19.21 m (63')
Width:
8.23 (27')
Height:
Ground clearance:
Weights and loadings
Weight:
37,000 kg (81,400 lb)
Power train
Engine:
Power-to-weight ratio:
Transmission:
Transfer case:
Axles:
Tracks:
Suspension:
Performance
Max land speed:
50 kph (31 mph)
Water speed:
15 kph (9 mph)
Acceleration:
Range at land, with 60-T payload, at 23 kph (14 mph):
241 km (150 mi)
Range at water, with 60-T payload, at 6 knts:
75 nm
Vertical obstacle:
Trench:
Max fording depth:
Gradient:
Side slope:
Turning diameter:
Weapon Systems
Main gun:
Max effective range:
Rate of fire:
Ammunition:
Ammunition type:
Rangefinder:
Night gun sight:
Program:
Basically having the same function as GKN's Aquatrack, though it has a larger capacity and runs on wheels. The PMC operates this vehicle usually for disaster relief operations throughout the country. Payload is 60 tons. Recently the PMC has made two LARC-V's operational to support the uparmored LVTH-6s in its inventory by carrying its additional ammunition requirements during amphibious operations with a third unit said to be operational by September 2006.

Photos of the LARC used by the Marines..

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Last modified on 11/07/11

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